DIOLKOS >> Gallery

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All 1960 pictures come from the En Athinais Archaeological Society (except the last one which is from the archives of F. Verdelis.

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The course-proper of Diolkos had in antiquity received the addition of a rectangular pavement, enclosed on its three sides by low walls. The original course is reported by Verdelis to continue under this structure.

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Many stones bear marks which belong to the signs of the old Corinthiam Alphabet. The marks are present all the more often near the end (or the beginning) of the course of Diolkos.

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A pavement of large, squared blocks, mentioned already in 1932 by H. N. Fowler (Corinth and the Corinthia) extends before - and to the side of - the course-proper of Diolkos. This sloping platform, reported by Fowler to extend for a distance of about forty meters, lies today in shreds.

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The diolkos literally demolished! Under the sand, in various states of distress, the blocks of Diolkos await their restoration.
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The violent deterioration continues and the supposedly "sane" part of the monument gets progressively smalller...

 

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The part of Diolkos to the right of the road leading to the moving bridge between Corinth and Loutraki, was also once majestic. A report of a guard in 1992, about the erosion approaching this part of the monument has been simply disregarded (as any similar alert...). Verdelis reports that, after a distance of 15 metres without traces of the monument, the course of Diolkos was once again found around the (then) edge of the canal.

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Neglect has had its cost also on the part of Diolkos excavated on the Attica side of the Canal, on the grounds of the Military Engineers' School. Here, a double row of stones resting upon the main course of Diolkos and bearing marks of ropes - a very interesting feature - has also suffered extensive mechanical damage.

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Two more images of the part of Diolkos upon the Sholi Mihanikou grounds. Majestic, as well as scientifically intriguing, Diolkos is a monument that has suffered enough offense in our modern world. Φθάνει πια!

 

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Last Updated on Saturday, 13 February 2010 05:10